Whitefish High School Library Collection Development Policy

Revised June, 2004

 

 

A.                 Introduction

1.                  Mission Statement:

 

The Whitefish High School Library’s mission is to enable its students and faculty to:

v     Effectively use instructional materials

v     Enrich and support all areas of the curriculum

v     Provide the necessary materials and instruction to enable students to learn effective ways to find information to meet his/her unique need

v     Use the library as the information center of the school

 

Our mission is to teach library media skills within a defined 9-12 library media curriculum so that students can successfully organize, analyze and interpret information for class work.  These skills are for a student’s preparation for higher education and/or as a future member of the workforce.

Finally, our mission is to involve students in, and be advocates of, the art of literature, reading, writing, and lifelong learning.

           

            Library’s Role in the Community

                        The Library’s role in the community is to provide its high school students with the finest library media services possible.  The library seeks to work with the Whitefish branch of the Flathead County Library system to provide students with resources they cannot get within the school district.  The library also serves local community patrons at their request.  These patrons typically are spouses of teachers, former students, or parents of students.

 

2.                  Purpose of the Policy

 

            The purpose of this policy is to analyze the collection and assess areas of its strengths and weaknesses.  It will be used as a tool to define future areas of the collection that should be addressed in terms of subject area and format.  With this tool, the library can continue to be responsive to our patrons.

 

3.                  Community and User Groups Defined

 

            Whitefish, Montana is located in northwestern Montana and has a population in the city limits of 5,032 according to the 2000census.  Located in Flathead County, it is located sixteen miles north of the county seat of Kalispell.  The economic base of Whitefish is mainly in tourism, timber and service industries.

            The Whitefish High School currently has a population of 670 students and serves grades 9-12.  Approximately 2000 students go to the Whitefish School District, grades K-12.  High School students generally range in age from 14-18.  The school is considered a Class A school within the parameters of  MSBA schools.  It, therefore, can be described as a medium-sized school district.  There are 44 members of the faculty.

 

            Primary users:  Students

a)      Ages:  14-18

b)      Education levels:  grades 9-12

c)       Occupations:  Students (some part/time workers)

d)      Numbers:  670

e)       Frequency of use:  25,000/year or about 200/day

f)        Reasons for use:  Class units, class research, recreation

 

            Secondary users:  Faculty

a)      Ages:  23-67 (approximately)

b)      Education levels:  B.A. to Ed. D.

c)       Occupations:  Teachers:  Special Ed., Guidance, Librarians, Student   teachers

d)      Number:  44 Faculty

e)       Frequency of use:  Two-thirds of the faculty use the library with their classes every year.

 

      Occasional users:  Administration, support staff, public, library volunteers, meeting place

a)      Ages:  25-75 (approximately)

b)      Education levels:  High School to Ed. D.

c)       Occupations:  Administration, clerical, janitorial, general work force, retirees

d)      Number:  11 (in school), 6 (public)

e)       Frequency of use:  occasional

f)        Reasons:  Reference, recreational, community meetings, equipment loans

 

            4.            Patrons Needs and Services/Programs Defined

                        Primary user needs:  Students

           

            Educational:  Book chat/appreciation of literature, library citizenship, media literacy. (Montana Library Standards)

           

            Recreational:  Students, grades 9-12 have recreational needs, primarily in the area of fiction (40% of circulation) and periodicals (5% of circulation), recreational non-fiction (health, sports).

           

            Research:  Research needs is for class units in collaboration with teachers.  Total class units were 111 in 2003-2004 school year.  Total classes were 623 during the same school year.

            Internet Access:  Internet access in two labs, automated catalog to the collection, software and hardware to present research.  Access to online databases.  Librarians help students to meet Montana education standards.

 

                  Secondary users:  Faculty

                       

                  Educational:  Library is a media center that supports teachers with computer lab, instructional media equipment and bibliographic and curricular support for classroom units.

 

Services and Programs Defined

1. Bibliographic Instruction (Information Skills)

Formal sessions with 9th graders, included with their English or History class work or in   isolation.  Pretest given to ninth graders and exit testing to 12th graders based on the Montana Office of Public Instruction standards for library/ media. 

2. Research units (Approximately 100 per year)

Units focus on English, Social Studies, and Science, and extend to Foreign Language, Business, Mathematics, Home Economics, and Health.

3. Book Chats

The librarians conduct one-on-one “book chats” with students in 9th and 11th grades in English and History classes.  These talks are based on the students’ understanding of plot, theme, character, setting and how the book relates to them personally. These personal dialogues help us in the following ways:

v     Learn what books the students are interested in

v     Learn second-hand about the books.  We can then order the books based on their recommendations

v     Get to know the students through their reading

 

4. Readers’ Club

The Library sponsors a Readers’ Club, which meets once per month. The club usually attracts fifteen members at each meeting.  We use the Pacific Northwest Library Association’s recommended senior list of books for members to read.  We also incorporate “Book One” from the Montana Center for the Book.  The Club hosts local authors when available. The Club has open membership and includes students, librarians, and faculty members.  Pins are awarded to active members at the close of each year.  The local PTA and concession sales support the funding of the program.

5. Database Searching

The Library provides database searching for the following products:

v     CountryWatch for information on countries

v     CQ Researcher for information on current political and social issues

v     Infotrac for an index and full-text to periodicals

v     World Book Online encyclopedia

v     Opposing Viewpoints for political, social and environmental issues.

 

6. General Public

Library materials such as books and videos may be checked out to residents of the District.  Audio/visual equipment may be checked out upon written request for community functions.

7. Technical Assistance for teachers and students

We provide assistance for teachers and students in the following ways:

1.      Teach students in the use of :

a.       software programs

b.      electronic catalog.

c.       newspaper and magazine online indexes

d.      online database programs.

e.       ESRI/GIS research

f.        internet etiquette

g.       image scanning technology

h.   file management

                                                                                                   i.      printer maintenance

               j.     general troubleshooting

 

2. Montana Heritage Project:

a. Create PowerPoint presentations for the Whitefish community

b. Burn CD’s

c. Provide recording equipment and space for personal interviews

 

8. Technology Access

We provide access to two computer labs and a min-lab in the library as well as a station to scan photographs.  The library is equipped with cable and satellite television.  Teachers may check out digital cameras, camcorders, laptops and video projectors for their classroom use.

           

Needs not currently being met:

 

1. The Library would like to increase collaboration with teachers in order to meet the Montana library/media standards.

2. Students and teachers need to have more access to audio CDs, especially for special education students and recreational uses.

3. Our Inter-library loan process could be improved by adopting the Web ILL product.

4. Community does not have access to the high school’s collection via the WWW.

5. The library’s Web page needs to be updated by linking to local newspapers and the Flathead County Library more easily.

6. Students should have access to adequate presentation, photo and sound editing software, for example, Photoshop Elements.

7. Students need to be taught media literacy skills, especially copyright issues, as per the Montana OPI standards.

 

5.         Brief Statement Describing the Collection: 

Our Collection has approximately 13,700 volumes.  We usually purchase about 600- 700 titles per school year.  This year we purchased approximately 700 items or 5% of our collection.  We primarily collect print materials for reading levels, grades 6 to 12, concentrating on grades 8-12. We also collect fiction for adults that advanced young adult readers would enjoy and use for research.

 

6.             Cooperative Collection Management and Inter-library Loan

 

Inter-library loan accounts for less than 1% of circulation.  The Library had 19 transactions of which 5 requests were from other libraries and 14 requests were from our library patrons.  Inter-library loan is considered a very valuable supplement to the collection, not a substitute for the collection. 

Currently, we borrow books using the OCLC’s LaserCat.  With LaserCat ending next year we will plan to use Web-ILL in the future as soon as a librarian is trained.

We have no deposit collection arrangements with other libraries.  Purchases are made in relation to perceived need of students to obtain materials within our library.  Our purpose is to have materials readily available for students in our library.  Subscription databases that are too expensive are not considered.  We do not rely on ILL for support of patrons’ primary needs.

            I would estimate that one-half of our collection is on LaserCat (6000 titles). 

 

B. General Priorities, Limitations and Policies

1. Chronological Coverage

Currency: According to the attached figures, the library contains, according to published date, the following:

 

                        Section             Ave. Age

000-099            1991

100-199            1988

200-299                     1983

300-399            1990

400-499            1980

500-599            1987

600-699            1988

700-799            1985

800-899            1977

900-999            1985

Biography            1984                       

Faculty                        1997

Fiction                        1987

Non-Print            1991

Reference            1987

           

Older publications are sometimes kept for research purposes, especially in history and literature.  This year we have weeded some of the 700s and all of the 900s.  We are in the process of weeding the Fiction section.

 

2.            Formats

The library collects books, periodicals, newspapers (for approximately one month), audio cassettes, videotapes, computer software, audio and digital CD-ROMs and DVDs.  We are currently buying both VHS and DVD formats with the thought that we are moving toward DVD.  Paperbacks are collected as well as textbooks from teachers. 

We also use five online databases: CountryWatch,Congressional Quarterly Online, World Book, Opposing Viewpoints and Infotrac. We also provide access to satellite (analog and digital) and cable television.  Cable television programs are recorded for teachers upon request.  Monthly listings of recommended shows are circulated for the teachers for their information.  All copyright guidelines are observed.  Most videos are purchased for teacher-guided units and are purchased for the high school level of interest and knowledge base.

Large print or microforms are not purchased.

3.  Multiple Copies

                  We generally do not purchase duplicates.  We only purchase items that are heavily used such as the Shakespeare Made Easy series or inexpensive videotapes that multiple teachers request for the same time period.  We also purchase dupliates of titles where theft or wear and tear is a concern such as the school’s yearbook or popular fiction.

4.            Languages

 

We teach both Spanish and French at the high school.  We purchase three foreign language magazines:  C’est Facile, Mome, and Paris Match.  We have purchased videotapes for French and Spanish classes as well as fiction that is in a foreign language.

 

 

 

5. Funding Considerations 

Librarians are responsible for presenting a proposed budget to the administration at the beginning of the budget cycle (February of the previous fiscal year).  Funding for the school is tied to enrollment, but library funding is not tied to a per pupil expenditure formula, per OPI standards.  Our budget has approximately doubled in the past seventeen years.  Our current budget is $26,000.  We do not receive Title IV monies.

We have received a grant from the Montana Heritage Project for $1500 for the purchase of print reference books.  This funding is expected for 2004-05 as well.

                        The local PTA donated $800 toward the purchase of paperbacks for our Reader’s Club program in 2003-04.

 

 

 

6. Collection Responsibilities and Selection Procedures:

The two full-time librarians select materials.  (OPI requires one and a half librarians for a school of our size.)  We take recommendations from faculty and students.  We spend almost all of our school non-print allocation on video requests from the teachers.

The process for selection is provided in the attached school board policy which was revised and approved by the Board of Trustees in 1999-2000.

The procedure for ordering books involves reviewing journals: School Library Journal, Booklist, Library Media Connection, etc. and adding titles through online book catalogs.  We also consider teacher and student requests. We order books in the fall and buy a smaller amount, 20% or so, in the spring. 

We primarily rely on journals and Amazon.com’s website to support our purchases due to concern regarding censorship.  The criteria we use for purchase is to support the standards-based curriculum of the Whitefish High School. We document the curricular units supported by the library and purchase materials to support those units.  (See addendum)  We purchase fiction to support the curriculum as well as to appeal to the recreational needs of the students, and to a lesser extent, the teachers.

We purchase some books from the local bookstore as well as from Baker and Taylor.

             

 

7. Gifts Policy

We will accept anything offered by the public but we stress that according to board policy we are not obligated to keep it. We would add material if it had historical importance.  If gifts are not usable they are retained for a short period and then given to the public library.

Both librarians make a decision regarding the suitability regarding gifts in regards to age of material, its attractiveness, and suitability to the collection.  We do not appraise gifts and therefore only send confirmation of the titles and number of items, not the value.

We have received small donations from townspeople and former teachers.  A program of donating a book to the library in a retiree’s name has been a tradition for several years.

 

8. Collection Maintenance

 

We generally “weed” books on rotational basis each year.  We have weeded in the 700s, 900s and fiction sections this year.  We need to because studies have shown that weeding actually increases the circulation of the collection. We generally weed when we feel that some materials are outdated and we go by subject area.

We use the following criteria for weeding:

·        if the book has not circulated in five years and is ten years old

·        has outdated material, or

·        lost its attractiveness

 

We hope to complete the weeding of the fiction area this year.

We then show the weeded books to teachers who may want them in their areas and/or take them to the public library for their annual sale.

We discard magazines after five years, newspapers after one or two months due to space limitations and lack of interest.  We keep a section of bound Newsweek and Time magazines for a “decades” unit in history.

We keep Montana books that may be somewhat out of date due to local importance and as per the request of the state library.

We rebind and repair materials that are of current use and replace items that get heavy use and are beyond repair and/or have lost pages.

 

9. Complaints and Censorship

 

One of the challenges of being a librarian in our town is that it is so diverse in its viewpoint.  We have both the extreme liberals as well as the extreme conservatives.  We have current board policy that I am in the process of trying to get revised.  It does not adequately provide for the input necessary for a good reconsideration process.  I am in touch with the superintendent to revise it.  Actually, our old school board policy was better, but with the advent of a “standardized” board policy revision, the policy was removed.

We have not had any informal or formal complaints from staff, parents, or townspeople in about ten years.  I believe the Internet is responsible for this to a certain extent.

We have an Acceptable Use Policy at the district level that controls, to a certain extent, student use of non-school related information. (See addendum)


 

C. Subject Areas Collected

 

1. Subjects: Defined by Dewey “hundreds.”

After consideration of the different approaches to define the needs of this collection, we have decided to categorize the broad classification number categories by Dewey “hundreds.”

We have “catalogued” the 111 units presented in the library within the past year and a half so that we can project our collection needs to the curricular needs of the school.

 

2. Present Collection Levels

 

000’s

 %  of collection

Strength

Weakness

AV

1

Various formats

World Book Online

Promote remote access

Encarta 1999 CD

Outdated Reader’s Guide Video

Need Goldwave or sound editing software

Per.

14

Heavily used

None

Ref.

17

Montana Heritage Project grant additional materials

Perhaps update ’83 print Britannica

Update ’02 World Book

Discard Academic Americana

Books

<1%

Relatively up-to-date

Update Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description:  Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

100’s

 

 

 

AV

2

Recently acquired titles

None

Per.

0

 

Plan to order “Psychology Today”

Ref.

1

Three new title purchases

Update philosophy

Books

1.2%

Good range of materials

Slightly out of date

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

200’s

 

 

 

AV

3

Supports Comparative Religion section

None

Per.

<1

Christian Science Monitor

No other titles

Ref.

1

Comprehensive collection

Update “Religions of the World” series

Books

1

Reasonably comprehensive

Replace older titles

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description:  Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300’s

 

 

 

AV

12

Reasonably up-to-date

Update “Power Game” series

Per.

7

Includes CQ Researcher online and professional journals

None

Ref.

18

Opposing Viewpoints Online

Weeding and updating, esp re new SAT tests

Books

10.4

Reasonably comprehensive

Update “Opposing Viewpoints”

Print series

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

400’s

 

 

 

AV

1

Recent titles

Need to communicate w/teachers re “Destinos”, pop. videos, books on tape

Per.

3

Good support for French

Need Spanish

Ref.

11

New Am. Heritage dictionaries

None

Books

<1

Supports demand, textbooks on reserve

Better communication w/teachers re their needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Minimal

 

 

 

 

 

 

500’s

 

 

 

AV

7

Recent titles added

Needs weeding

Per.

2

Good cross section of titles

None

Ref.

7

Basic collection

Needs weeding and updating

Books

4.1

Updated collection

Needs weeding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

600’s

 

 

 

AV

9

Good collection

Some need re-cataloging

Per.

18

Good collection

None

Ref.

5

Meets needs

Needs weeding: New Drug set and technology titles

Books

4.5

Good cross section

Needs updating

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

700’s

 

 

 

AV

6

Basic Collection

Communicate w/drama teacher re updating

Per.

30

Strong circulation

Update

Ref.

3

Basic sources

Update Sports Almanac

Books

4.6

Good coverage

Needs updating

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

800’s

 

 

 

AV

14

Strong Shakespeare collection

Update

Per.

5

Basic list; acquired English Journal

None

Ref.

8

Basic

Needs updating

Books

8

Strong Collection

Needs weeding and updating

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

900’s

 

 

 

AV

23

Strong collection

None

Per.

10

Good collection

None

Ref.

28

Strong collection

None

Books

14.3

Strong, basic collection; weeded this year

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIO

 

 

 

AV

6

Strong, basic

Needs diversity

Per.

N/A

N/A

N/A

Ref.

N/A

N/A

N/A

Books

6.1

Strong collection

Need popular subjects

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description:  Basic

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIC

 

 

 

AV

16

Strong, basic collection

More student oriented

Per.

N/A

N/A

N/A

Ref.

N/A

N/A

N/A

Books

24.5

Basic Collection

Needs new titles and weeding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: Basic

 

 

       

 

3. Future acquisitions levels or goals

 

 

Changes

Priority

Time Frame

Action

000’s

Update ’83 print Britannica

1

04-05

Purchase

 

Update World Book

3

06-07

Purchase

 

Discard ’98 Americana

1

04-05

Replace

 

Add sound-editing software

1

04-05

Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

100’s

Order Psychology Today

1

04-05

Purchase

 

Update philosophy titles in reference

2

05-06

Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

200’s

“Religions of the World” series

1

04-05

Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

300’s

New government videos

1

04-05

Purchase

 

Update CQ Press Books

1

04-05

Purchase

 

Update College Prep materials

1

04-05

Purchase

 

Update Opposing Viewpoints series

1

04-05

Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

400’s

Talk w/foreign language teachers re “Destinos” series, popular movies, books on tapes and Spanish magazine

1

04-05

 

 

Pictorial dictionaries

1

04-05

Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

500’s

No action

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600’s

Update drug reference set

1

04-05

Purchase

 

Update and weed technology reference

˝

04-06

Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

700’s

Update AV drama/tech area

1

04-05

Purchase

 

Add updated Sports Almanac

1

04-05

Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

800’s

Update drama books

1

04-05

Purchase

 

 

 

 

 

900’s

No action

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIO

Need more popular subjects, weed

1

04-05

Purchase and weed

 

 

 

 

 

FIC

Continue to add popular fiction

1

04-05

Purchase

4. Special Collections:

            We discourage the use of non-circulating materials in our library.  We do keep a set of Whitefish High School annuals dating from the 50s that circulate upon request.  We have a set of scrapbooks documenting student life from local newspapers from 1988 to the present.  We also have copies of the student newspaper from the 1930s to the present.

 

 


D. Policy Implementation, Evaluation, and Revision

The librarians will evaluate this policy every three years.  We anticipate going through the same process: collecting data from our Follett software program in regards to currency, reviewing circulation statistics and collection percentages.  Other sources of information are available in annual reports and with students.  We plan to revise this document in March, 2007.

 

Librarian ________________________________________                        Date________

Librarian ________________________________________                        Date________

Principal ________________________________________                        Date________

Superintendent ___________________________________                        Date________

Chair, Board of Trustees ____________________________            Date________

 


 

 

 

 

Appendices:

 

1. Collection Age by Call Number

2. Category Statistics

3. Collection Statistics

4. Whitefish High School Library Units 2003-04

5. Whitefish High School Library Units related to Corresponding Dewey # and the percentage of those areas of study in relation to entire library unit curriculum.

6. Whitefish School District Board Policy on Selection

7. Whitefish School District Board Policy on Reconsideration

8. Whitefish High School Acceptable Use Policy

9. Worksheet for statistical analysis